Simple life Manhattan: a 90-square-foot microstudio

author Kirsten Dirksen   8 год. назад
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Manhattan shoebox apartment: a 78-square-foot mini studio

A couple years ago, Manhattan architect Luke Clark Tyler, lived in a 96 square foot apartment. Instead of upsizing with his latest move, he chose to squeeze himself and his belongings into even less space. Luke now lives in a 78 square foot shoebox studio. It's too narrow to fit a bed lengthwise, but using a bit of plywood and 2x4s he built his own custom bed/couch. He keeps his clothes, plates, microwave, books, spices and shaving and cleaning supplies in a large built-in cabinet. The rest of his kitchen is a tiny refrigerator that helps hold up his desk (he works for home as a contract architect). While he admits he misses being able to cook a real meal- though he's vegetarian so eats a lot of vegetables and nuts and can even microwave eggs- Luke doesn't see living small as a sacrifice. He loves living in the heart of New York City- his place is in Midtown Manhattan's Hell's Kitchen- and he likes paying just $750/month (cheaper than the shared housing he could find in the area). Luke's website: www.lukeclarktyler.com Original story: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/manhattan-shoebox-apartment-a-78-square-foot-live-in-closet/

We Tried An Overnight Bus Hotel From Los Angeles To San Francisco

Cabin is a bus with sleeping pods that goes from LA to SF in one night Credits: https://www.buzzfeed.com/bfmp/videos/63566 Subscribe to Bring Me for locations, thrills, and experiences around the world that’ll instantly make you say, “bring me.” http://bit.ly/2r9Apsb Facebook http://bit.ly/2HyOTc7 + Instagram @bringme http://bit.ly/2Kjb3R9 MUSIC Licensed via Audio Network VIDEO Aerial view of San Francisco city skyline and Bay Bridge at sunrise TawaMedia/Getty Images Downtown Los Angeles at Sunset - Aerial Shot halbergman/Getty Images

Remarkable Discovery Underground At Abandoned Hydraulic Mine

We don’t often do videos on hydraulic mines and that is simply because there aren’t many of them... This is mostly due to hydraulic mines being enormous operations with few places where the conditions are right for them to have existed. They don’t end up on the environmentally friendly list of mining techniques either, but the process is interesting (at least to me) nevertheless. My exploring buddy, Mr. McBride, (his YouTube channel is Adit Addicts) located this sluice tunnel on our first visit to this site a couple of years ago. At that time, we met the owner of the mine and accompanying ghost town (well, almost a ghost town) who invited us to look around. We weren’t properly equipped to explore the tunnel at that time and also had Mr. McBride’s daughters with us. So, we saved this one for another trip. While I was editing the video, I realized that many are probably not very familiar with the history I’m discussing and the terms I’m throwing around. So, I’ll take a crack at explaining hydraulic mining as seen in this video: Many millions of years ago, large rivers ran through this area. These rivers ran through areas that contained rich gold deposits. As today, when erosion released the gold in the rocks, the gold would tumble down into the rivers or be washed into them. Gold – being heavy - would slowly sink down through the sand, gravel and mud in the river channel, accumulating on the bedrock beneath the river. Eventually, volcanic eruptions killed these ancient rivers, burying them deep under ash and lava flows. Millions of years later, after the early “Gold Rush” miners had picked the easy gold from California’s modern rivers and streams, they started trying to locate the source of the gold they had been finding. It wasn’t long before they started heading beneath the earth, soon encountering river gravel hundreds of feet underground. This fabulously rich gravel set off a stampede to locate all of the ancient river channels playing host to placer gold. Countless underground placer mines sprang into existence to bore their way into mountains, desperately seeking ancient river channels. For those with the means, hydraulic mining offered access to the underground placers on a massive scale… Water was diverted from a source above the hydraulic mine into a series of pipes leading to the site that the miners wished to work. The water (flowing downhill) was run through an increasingly small series of pipes (building up pressure in the increasingly confined space) until it exited from a small nozzle known as a “monitor.” By this point, the water was practically exploding out of the nozzle as it was under tremendous pressure. This roaring jet of water smashed into the sides of hills and mountains like a giant hammer and swiftly washed away anything it hit. The process soon removed the overburden, exposing the ancient river channels the miners were after. With the volume of water flowing from the monitor, everything being knocked loose was washed down into ditches that then dropped into drain tunnels (as seen in this video). The sand, mud and gravel the gold is mixed in with came cascading into the series of large sluice boxes lining the tunnels. The riffles embedded in the sluice boxes would snag the heavy gold, which naturally sinks to the bottom, while the lighter mud, gravel and sand would simply flow over the riffles and out of the tunnel into the creeks and rivers below (there’s another story there). Periodically, the roaring water monitors would be switched off and the miners would then walk along the sluice boxes, scooping up the gold trapped behind the riffles (often with the assistance of mercury). The hydraulic mines took a lot of work to set up and took a lot of capital to do so, but they took out a LOT of gold. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mines have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring

Britains Biggest Hoarders

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Graham Hill's NYC tiny flat #2 attunes L space to the moment

Graham Hill began experimenting with small space living in 2010 when he bought two units in a pre-war coop in New York City’s Soho. He ran a competition to redesign the first rundown flat, and the winners, Romanian architecture students Catalin Sandu and Andrei Butusina, created a moving wall and transformable furniture so the one room could function as three or four. He sold LifeEdited1, or LE1, a few years ago and began work on his second experiment in living with less, LE2, which he hoped would be more affordable and less of a white box. This time he and his team created sliding couch-cubes that can be pushed from room to room to add seating to a couch/dining room or to configure into a queen-sized bed. There’s also lots of felt to absorb sound (both on walls and as a dividing curtain). Ditching LE1’s movable wall - it didn’t block sound and was too expensive - the LifeEdited crew settled for an accordion door (it shrinks to one-tenth it’s expanded size and can fit into tiny closet in the wall). More often found in conference halls or schools, here the expando-wall divides the guest bedroom/office from the rest of the space. “When it's out it has the acoustic properties of a 2-by-4 insulated stud wall with drywall so it's very effective at sound insulation.” LE1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XYV0qATsyts More info on LE2: http://lifeedited.com/lifeedited-2/ LE2 is for sale: https://www.corcoran.com/nyc-real-estate/for-sale/soho-nolita/150-sullivan-street-apt-33/5521991 Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/graham-hills-nyc-tiny-flat-2-attunes-l-space-to-the-moment/

By choosing a studio that measures just 12 feet by 7 feet, Felice Cohen can afford to live in Manhattan's Upper West Side where apartments rent for an average of $3,600 per month. She pays just over $700 for her 90-square-foot microstudio. After a bit of adjustment she now loves living smaller, simpler and cozier.

Felice's book "90 Lessons for Living Large in 90 s.f.": http://www.amazon.com/Lessons-Living-Large-Square-Feet-ebook/dp/B01CM3XU0E

Felice's website: www.felicecohen.com

Original story here: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/simple-life-manhattan-a-90-square-foot-microstudio/

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